Published: Wed, July 11, 2018
Worldwide | By Jermaine Blake

US President Donald Trump names Brett Kavanaugh his Supreme Court nominee

US President Donald Trump names Brett Kavanaugh his Supreme Court nominee

Of the court's liberal justices, Ruth Bader Ginsburg is 85 and Stephen Breyer turns 80 next month, so Trump may well get another opportunity to cement conservative dominance of the court for years to come.

"I've spent the last three days interviewing and thinking about Supreme Court justices".

Some conservatives have expressed concerns about Kavanaugh - a longtime judge and former clerk for Kennedy - questioning his commitment to social issues like abortion and noting his time serving under President George W. Bush as evidence he is a more establishment choice. Trump made the announcement on Tuesday afternoon (NZ time). Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (Ky.) told the president over the weekend that Hardiman and Kethledge would face the fewest obstacles to confirmation.

Top Senate Democrat Chuck Schumer called Trump recently to warn it would be "cataclysmic" for national unity if he nominated someone hostile to Roe v Wade, the landmark 1973 decision that protects women's rights to abortion, according to a person familiar with the discussion.

Democratic Senator Dianne Feinstein said Trump's choice "could have a bigger effect on Americans' daily lives than any justice in our lifetime".

Casey is one of the handful of so-called "Red State" Democratic senators who are running for reelection in a state carried by the president in the 2016 election, and who are seen as especially vulnerable this election cycle as a result.

Barrett is a Notre Dame Law School alumna, and she received the Hoynes Prize, the Law School's highest honor.

Judge Rules USC Doesn't Owe Steve Sarkisian Anything in $30 Million Lawsuit
Sarkisian first got into trouble at USC after he went on a "booze-filled rant" at a Salute To Troy event in August 2015. The 44-year-old Sarkisian went into alcohol rehabilitation treatment after he was sacked .

Tour de France: BMC win stage three team time trial
It would have been nice not to have lost it in the first place. "We're taking some time back on some of the other GC guys", said Porte.

Former Arizona Sen. Jon Kyl to guide Trump's Supreme Court nominee
Kennedy said he was bracing for a tough confirmation battle as Democrats focus on the nominee's views of the high court's Roe v. Schumer says if Kavanaugh is confirmed, "women's reproductive rights would be in the hands of five men on the Supreme Court ".

The nominee must be confirmed by the US Senate, which the Republican president's party narrowly controls 51-49. He added: "I think they'd be fine justices of the Supreme Court". While waiting, he's penned he has written almost 300 opinions and sent 41 of his law clerks to similar posts at the high court - far more than any of the other leading candidates for the nomination.

On the past quarter century's most consequential and controversial issues, from racial preferences to religious freedom to reproductive rights, Kennedy often bridged the gap between the court's liberals and conservatives. Raymond Kethledge is a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 6th Circuit who has been dubbed "Gorsuch 2.0".

In a 2013 law review article, Kavanaugh wrote that after seeing firsthand the many hard duties that a president encounters, he thinks that presidents should operate free from the threat of civil suits, such as the sexual harassment suit that led to Clinton's impeachment, and that presidents should also be free from criminal investigation.

Those views could have implications for independent counsel Robert Mueller's investigation of Trump. Ten Democrats from states that Trump won are up for re-election this fall and will be under tremendous pressure to back the president's nominee.

Raymond Kethledge of MI, who also has many high-profile supporters who see him as a positive alternative to the other three. I'm open to voting no. "We have to pick one that's going to be there for 40 years, 45 years". Doug Jones of Alabama.

Later in the week, the president also suggested that of the four reported shortlisted candidates, he had preferences, telling reporters: "I think I have it down to four people".

If Collins and Murkowski vote "no" and Democrats all vote "no", the nomination would be blocked.

Like this: