Published: Sun, August 12, 2018
Science | By Michele Flores

NASA launches historic mission to 'touch sun'

NASA launches historic mission to 'touch sun'

Nasa has launched a satellite that will fly closer to the sun than any of its predecessors.

The car-sized, $1.5 billion Parker Solar Probe launched on a Delta IV Heavy rocket from Cape Canaveral, Florida.

The launch of the United Launch Alliance Delta IV Heavy rocket carrying the spacecraft was scrubbed yesterday due to a violation of a launch limit, resulting in a hold.

In an unprecedented quest, the Parker Solar Probe will fly within 3.8 million miles of the sun's surface.

That's around 4 per cent of the distance between the earth and the sun.

The mission hopes to uncover the sun's mysteries.

"The Parker Solar Probe will help us do a much better job of predicting when a disturbance in the solar wind could hit Earth", said Justin Kasper, a project scientist and professor at the University of MI.

Instruments on board may also help to explain why the corona is hotter than the sun's surface by several orders of magnitude.

News Corp worldwide reports $1.4bn net loss, but paid subscriptions rise
Digital revenues represented 30% of News and Information Services segment revenues in the quarter, compared to 26% a year ago. Furthermore, News Corp's expenses before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortisation rose 21 per cent to US$1.07 billion.

Leeds defeat a reality check, says Derby manager Frank Lampard
Carson was called into action to deny Roofe at point-blank range with Tomori making a last-ditch block to deny Ayling on the rebound.

Newcastle United suffer unlucky defeat to Tottenham on opening day
One for the future in Luke Amos, perhaps; the 21-year-old made his Premier League debut, coming on for the final few minutes. Tottenham Hotspur beat Newcastle United 2-1 at St.

By coming closer to the Sun than any spacecraft in history, the unmanned probe's main goal is to unveil the secrets of the corona, the unusual atmosphere around the Sun.

The probe is the first NASA spacecraft with a living namesake.

The spacecraft is named after 91-year old solar physicist Eugene Parker, 91, who was the first scientist to describe solar wind in 1958.

The $1.5 billion craft will travel towards the centre of our solar system on a mission to discover more about unsafe solar storms.

"The Parker Solar Probe will help us do a much better job of predicting when a disturbance in the solar wind could hit Earth", said Justin Kasper, a project scientist and professor at the University of MI.

Over the course of seven years, Parker will make 24 loops around our star to study the physics of the corona, the place where much of the important activity that affects the Earth seems to originate.

"We'll also be the fastest human-made object ever, travelling around the Sun at speeds of up to 690,000km/h (430,000mph) - NY to Tokyo in under a minute!" she told BBC News.

Like this: